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Civil engineering - France

Tokamak reactor building for the ITER project

Under the Diagnostics Building, the seismic pads are less numerous than under the Tokamak
Under the Diagnostics Building, the seismic pads are less numerous than under the Tokamak - © VINCI and subsidiaries
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A consortium made up of VINCI subsidiaries - VINCI Construction Grands Projects (leader), Dodin Campenon Bernard (VINCI Construction), VINCI Construction France (58.3%), Ferrovial Agroman (30%) and Razel-Bec (11.7%), signed the €300 million, 5.5 year contract with Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Union organisation in charge of Europe's contribution to the ITER project, covering construction of the Tokamak reactor building and design and construction of 9 ancillary buildings at the Cadarache site north of Aix en Provence.

120 metre long, 80 metre wide, 80 metre high reinforced concrete building
Design studies got under way in April 2013 and the main civil engineering works will start in the autumn of 2013. The main building will house the Tokamak reactor, a 28 metre diameter, 29 metre high, 23,000 tonne cylinder. With the two ancillary buildings that adjoin it, it will constitute a 120 metre long, 80 metre wide, 80 metre high reinforced concrete sturcture. The other structures comprise the Assembly Building, a two-storey Control Building and various industrial type buildings. The contract also covers large dimension (4 m x 4 m, 40 tonne) anti-radiatiom highly pressure resistants nuclear doors, to be designed and built by a consortium comprising Cegelec (a VINCI Energies business unit) and Sommer.

International cooperation
The ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project is a unique example of international cooperation the field of energy. ITER will be the largest experimental fusion facility ever built. The programme was designed to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion research aims to develop a safe, inexhaustible, environmentally friendly source of energy. Europe's contribution represents nearly half the cost of building the machine; the six other members involved in the international cooperative project (China, Japan, India, South Korea, Russia and the United States) will share the remaining funding equally.

Find out more: http://www.iter.org